Inequality Inquiry >> Category

Formulating a Fix: Past, Present, and Future State and Federal Efforts to Rectify the Abuses of Form Contracts

June 13, 2020

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by Chad K. Hermes† View/Download PDF Version Table of Contents Part I: The Standard Form Contract Part II: Legislative Action to Limit Oppressive Terms in Form Contracts A. Federal Action to Limit Oppressive Terms B. State Action to Limit Oppressive Terms Part III: Further Efforts Legislatures Should Make to Limit Oppressive Terms A. Principles-Based Enforcement…

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Turning Gaming Dollars into Non-Gaming Revenue: Hedging for the Seventh Generation

May 27, 2016

by Shane Plumer
There are four levels of diversification that tribes engage in: level one consists of amenities to gaming facilities; level two consists of tourist-reliant non-gaming businesses; level three involves on-reservation businesses that export products off the reservation; and the most sophisticated level involves acquiring off-reservation businesses in order to access more diverse markets. Historically, tribal economic development has been hindered by lack of access to capital markets, limitations placed on federal funding, federal Indian policy that requires creation of jobs on the reservation, information asymmetry and conservative investment strategies that are holdovers from how federal agencies invested tribal funds. This article provides a roadmap for cutting-edge tribal economic development that focuses on off-reservation investment by mobilizing investment banks and private equity in order to diversify tribal investment portfolios.

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Opportunity Zones: Gambling with Our General Welfare

January 5, 2021

Economic inequality is at a breaking point. “Opportunity Zones” operate currently to expand specific welfare rather than general welfare. Reforms may be imminent, but OZs reveal how private-public partnerships often prioritize the interests of only a few.

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Who’s Benefiting from Attorney General Settlement Agreements?

June 3, 2021

Anna Berglund*   Lately, when we read about state Attorneys General (AGs) in the news, we hear about them suing battleground states to try to overturn election results[1] or suing the Trump administration 138 times—almost double the number of times the Obama and Bush administrations were sued—over various policies.[2] Although state AGs are increasingly ramping…

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